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YongTae (Tony) Kim – Georgia Institute of Technology ($100,000 Grant)

Posted by on Jun 9, 2015 in News | 0 comments

YongTae (Tony) Kim – Georgia Institute of Technology ($100,000 Grant)

On May 5, 2015, at the annual meeting of The CART Fund, YongTae (Tony) Kim, PhD, Assistant Professor of George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology was awarded a CART Grant in the amount of $100,000.

Research Project

In collaboration with Malú G. Tansey, Ph.D, Associate Professor of Physiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Dr. Kim will study Advanced CNS Drug Delivery via Lipoprotein-Polymer Nanocomplexes in Experimental Alzheimer’s Disease.

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CART Fast Facts 2015

Posted by on Jun 2, 2015 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

CART Fast Facts 2015

Looking for Fast Facts on The CART Fund? The 2015 CART Fast Facts sheet is now available!   Download your copy now!

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Emory receives $25M from Goizueta Foundation for Early AD Detection

Posted by on Mar 5, 2015 in News | 0 comments

Emory receives $25M from Goizueta Foundation for Early AD Detection

Emory University’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center will receive a transformational donation to support advanced research into early detection of Alzheimer’s disease.

The Goizueta Foundation is committing $25 million toward research aimed at fundamentally changing the way Alzheimer’s disease is detected and treated.

Dr. Allan Levey, recipient of the first CART grant in 1999 is the Director of Emory’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (ADRC).

Dr. Levey currently serves on the three-person Scientific Review Panel that reviews projects for the 2015 CART Fund grants.

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Lamb findings on brain inflammation reduce placque formation

Posted by on Mar 5, 2015 in News | 0 comments

Lamb findings on brain inflammation reduce placque formation

Research update from Dr. Bruce Lamb, 2013 CART Grant Recipient:

Dr. Bruce Lamb and colleagues from Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute demonstrate the true role of TREM2 in AD in study published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Previously thought to protect against Alzheimer’s, Dr. Lamb has discovered that TREM2 actually promotes the disease.

Deleting the TREM2 receptor in mice decreased plaque formation, reduced brain inflammation, and improved the survival of neurons. This protection was associated with fewer infiltrating macrophages. Macrophages lacking TREM2 were apparently better at engulfing beta-amyloid aggregates, suggesting that they might assist in the brain clean-up effort.

Although additional studies are needed to clarify the exact mechanism of TREM2’s action in AD, these results suggest that toning down the receptor’s activity may help put a stop to neurodegeneration in AD patients.

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